How Do You Secure Your Vehicle? Another Word of Caution.

Technology is great. Today we have gadgets that make our lives simpler and more efficient.  The problem is for every new gadget there comes potential risks, making our lives harder and more complex again, especially in today’s society where too many individuals are looking for ways to rip things off and get things for free.

Today’s concern for caution relates to using keychain remotes to lock and arm you vehicle.  If you’re like me, you hit the lock button, wait to hear the car horn sound, and walk away thinking your car is secure until you return.  Ignorance is bliss, and you enjoy your evening out, only to come back and find your things missing from your car (or your car gone altogether).

How could that have happened – I know I locked and alarmed my car?

Well, burglars now sit in parking lots, watching and waiting for unsuspecting car owners to remotely lock and arm their cars.  Then the thieves use a device that intercepted the remote’s signal, and remotely unlock your vehicle, stealing everything within the car.

The best advice I have found so far is to go back to using the door lock buttons mounted on the door’s themselves.  Hit the lock button before closing the door, and then use your remote to arm the security system.  A second piece of advice is to leave nothing in your car.

Isn’t it terrible that we have to think about all these things in response to individuals exploiting the gadgets designed to make our lives easier and less stressful?

One comment on “How Do You Secure Your Vehicle? Another Word of Caution.
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